Mystery and fantasy writing

Posts tagged ‘Fictional Detectives’

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A Day in the Life

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A Day in the Life of David Randall is featured on Dru’s Book Musing.

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Two New Books for 2017

A couple of new books are coming this spring. Baby, Take a Bow, is the fifth in the Grace Street series. When Camden’s friend Rufus’s ex-wife Bobbi is murdered and her baby is missing, David Randall has to juggle several different mysteries to solve the case. Camden also encounters a restless spirit trapped within a mirror, and another ghost haunting the hot dog restaurant.

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The Monsters of Spiders’ Rest is the third in the Three Worlds series of fantasy novels. Flickfoot, an intelligent spider, and his spider friends Plinks and Jellyroll are alarmed when their creator’s grandson, Tylin, shows up to take over their house. But there are much more dangerous monsters in the forests, monsters who plan to invade the neighboring town of Specter. Can Flickfoot convince Ty of the danger? Can he even convince him that the spiders are his friends?

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New Review

I try not to pay too much attention to my reviews, good or bad, but this time, I’m making an exception. Evil Turns, the latest Madeline Maclin Mystery, will be published this May, but already has a good review from Kirkus. Kirkus is a book review magazine that’s been around since the 1930s, and it’s not always easy to get a review, especially a favorable one. As a former librarian, I often used Kirkus to determine if a book was suitable for my library, so when I received word about the review, I had a little Twilight Zone moment. And I have to admit with another Madeline book and several more Grace Street mysteries in the works, it’s nice to have validation. 15PP009-Evil-Turns-Cover

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/jane-tesh/evil-turns/

Update on Online Release Party

Tomorrow at 3 PM, please join me at Bitten By Books for an online release party/chat session/and Q&A!

Here’s a link where you can RSVP.

http://bittenbybooks.com/author-jane-tesh-release-party-and-50-00-amazon-gift-card-contest-210-rsvp-here/

I’ve also posted this on Facebook and Twitter. If you’re on Twitter, please reTweet the link!

The link to the actual event will be available tomorrow.

Instead of a $25 Amazon gift card, you can win a $50 Amazon gift card.

If you RSVP, you get 25 additional chances on this gift card!

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The Wait is Over!

Today is the official release date for Just You Wait, my eighth published mystery novel and the fourth in the Grace Street Series, all from Poisoned Pen Press, http://www.poisonedpenpress.com.

Besides the usual book signings and author events, I’ll be taking part in my first online chat February 10 at 3 PM Eastern on http://www.bittenbybooks.com. I’m not exactly sure how it works, but I’m excited to try!

A $25 gift card from Amazon will be awarded and a copy of the book. Please stop by on February 10 and find out if I can indeed find my way through the vast inter-web to answer your questions!

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Now You See It Trailer

 

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When one of my friends heard I was getting a book trailer, he thought I was buying an actual trailer full of books to pull around behind my car.  No, I said, this is the latest thing, a little commercial of sorts for your book, a preview, like you’d see in the movies.  I thought it would be worth a try, and thanks to the great folks at Book Candy Studios, who put together the images and the music, I now have a mini-movie of the latest Grace Street Mystery, Now You See It.

 

Male Call

Okay, I’ll confess right away that I’m the only Southern woman in the world who hasn’t seen “Steel Magnolias.” Or “Fried Green Tomatoes.” I’m sure they are wonderful stories that have brought happiness and closure to millions, but if I want to hear a bunch of women talking, I can go to any beauty parlor, teachers’ lounge, back yard or church group and hear it all in graphic gossipy detail. But what’s going on with the guys? That’s what I want to know.

I’ve always been fascinated by the friendship between two very different men. Women have loads of friends. You’ve got your shop till you drop friend, your cry on my shoulder friend, your exercise buddy, your old school friends – loads of them. Men may have a lot of pals, but usually have one really good friend, and they don’t even confide everything to him. The two friends in my Grace Street Mysteries are searching, as everyone is searching, for home and family. David Randall, my investigator, is dealing with the death of his little daughter. Camden, his best friend, is dealing with his unwanted psychic ability and the fact his mother gave him up for adoption when he was only a few days old. Both men have women in their lives they are trying to win. Both men care for each other in that strange gruff way men have.

Here’s an example of a serious discussion: “You okay?” “Yeah.”

My friend John writes only from a female perspective, all about abused women and their trials and tribulations. This is what he grew up with and what he’s trying to understand. The men in my early years, father, grandfather, and many uncles and great-uncles, were loving and nurturing, and wonderful story tellers, but there was also an air of mystery about them. You never caught them soul searching, or dissing the farmers in the pasture next door, or gossiping about, well, anything. They were sportsmen and hunters, loved to fish, could repair cars, build houses, fix faulty wiring and leaky faucets. But what went on behind those serious male faces? At times, they seemed as remote as mountains. I was always so curious, but as a child, never thought to ask.

As writers, we love to walk around in someone else’s life, to imagine how things are from the other side. I think it was Stephen King who said that a writer should have “an androgynous mind,” (although his probably has a few sharp teeth, as well.) It’s quite an adventure to explore how opposite and how very much the same the opposite sex can be. There are many things I wish I had asked my father. Now through my characters, I look for answers.

Just to make sure I’m as accurate as possible, I always run things by my brother, my touchstone for all things masculine. “Is this something a man would say?” I’ll ask. “Is this how a man would handle these feelings?” And Joe’s answer is always the same:

“Yeah.”